Tuesday, February 02, 2016

On #Consumerism ...

Buying stuff to make yourself feel better ... yeah, it doesn't work, okay?

That 'shiny shiny high' feeling lasts about twenty minutes .. and then you have to pay for something you're really not sure you ever wanted.


Buy less. Live more.

When You Write A Blog Post ...

Yeah, sometimes it really is just like this ...



Saturday, October 24, 2015

Rosa Parks .. A Genuine 20th Century Heroine We Must Never Forget ...

Rosa Parks died 10 years ago, today, October 24th 2005.


She looks like everybody's favourite aunt or grandma, doesn't she?

But on 1st December 1955, she was just tired of being a second class citizen. In Montgomery, Alabama, Parks refused to obey a bus driver's order to give up her seat in the colored section to a white passenger, after the white section was filled.

"People always say that I didn't give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn't true. I was not tired physically, or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day. I was not old, although some people have an image of me as being old then. I was forty-two. No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in."

Parks was not the first person to resist bus segregation. Others had taken similar steps, including Bayard Rustin in 1942, Irene Morgan in 1946, Sarah Louise Keys in 1952, and the members of the ultimately successful Browder v. Gayle lawsuit (Claudette Colvin, Aurelia Browder, Susie McDonald, and Mary Louise Smith) who were arrested in Montgomery for not giving up their bus seats months before Parks.

Parks' act of defiance and the Montgomery Bus Boycott became important symbols of the modern Civil Rights Movement. She became an international icon of resistance to racial segregation. She organized and collaborated with civil rights leaders, including Edgar Nixon, president of the local chapter of the NAACP; and Martin Luther King, Jr., a new minister in town who gained national prominence in the civil rights movement.  

"It was just time... there was opportunity for me to take a stand to express the way I felt about being treated in that manner. I had not planned to get arrested. I had plenty to do without having to end up in jail. But when I had to face that decision, I didn't hesitate to do so because I felt that we had endured that too long."

When she passed away, her casket was transported to Washington, D.C. and transported by a bus similar to the one in which she made her protest, to lie in honor in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol. She was the first woman and the second black person to lie in state in the Capitol. An estimated 50,000 people viewed the casket there, and the event was broadcast on television on October 31, 2005.

A quiet, gentle, rather ordinary woman who just made a very brave stand one day and became, against her will, an icon of the fight for Race Equality.

Ordinary people can become extraordinary.

The fight for Equality of all kinds continues in her honour.

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Richard Thompson covers "Oops, I Did It Again" ...

What happens when a multi award-winning, universally lauded musician with 25 albums under his belt takes a crap pop song and makes it his ? This.

Richard Thompson, OBE, who started his career in 1967 with Fairport Convention, strips this song down, reconstructs it and makes it pretty damn good.

Sunday, August 30, 2015